BIG IS BETTER: A Step-By-Step Guide To Creating Massive Beehives and Bouffants

I was under the impression that beehives and bouffants were the same thing, but turns out, a beehive is technically a bigger, more exaggerated version of a bouffant. I’m going to show you the easiest way to create your own, whether you want to go big and beehive it all the way or stay classy and subdued with a smaller bouffant.

May 31, 2013 at 5:00pm | Leave a comment

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A Bouffant.

 
I’ve shown you rag rolls and victory rolls, but I have yet to show you a hair-do from my favorite era of all: the 60‘s! I’m all about girl-groups and the style that comes with them; I’m especially fond of The Ronettes, who have inspired both my love of big hair and a strong cat-eye. 
 
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Be my baby

 
Initially, I was under the impression that beehives and bouffants were the same thing, but turns out, a beehive is technically a bigger, more exaggerated version of a bouffant. I’m going to show you the easiest way to create your own, whether you want to go big and beehive it all the way or stay classy and subdued with a smaller bouffant. Either way, you can’t go wrong. I’m pretty sure beehives and bouffants go with everything!
 
Supplies include a bristle brush, a comb, super-strong hairspray, hair serum and a whole lot of bobby pins. 
 
I’ve been using Aveda Control Force Hairspray, which has serious hold, but I’m betting AquaNet also does the job. When it comes to serum, I only use it if my hair is freshly washed. Creating volume is way easier if your hair is kind of dirty. The serum I use is Aubrey NuStyle Organic Soothing Serum, which is super oily so a few drops do the trick. It gives my hair back some of it’s natural, slick shine.
 
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Serum hair.

 
The Bouffant
 
The bouffant, at least the way I do it, is the perfect on-the go style, especially since you don’t need to tease too much. It’s my favorite way to throw my hair up and still look classy with dirty hair. It’s also less damaging than a beehive, which involves quite a bit more teasing.
 
You can start the bouffant by separating the top section of your hair. 
 
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You’re left with a mini poof that gives your hair some natural volume. This section is not totally necessary, I just think it helps when you go into the next step. 
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Brush your hair upward until you have a sort of pony-tail shape coming out of the top of your head. Twist your hair tightly, but leave the section closest to your crown relatively loose.
 
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Roll the giant twisted piece of hair around your fingers (like you would a giant rag roll) and keep tucking and rolling upward until you get what looks like the perfect little front poof! 
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Pin each side of the giant roll down, aiming the bobby pins toward each other. Add as many more pins as you feel necessary. Depending how loose your roll was, your hair might come up a bit school-marmish, but you can always pin the sides down or add a hairband like I did in the first photo. A hairband adds some 60’s flair and easily tames the pouffy sides 
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The Beehive:
 
When it comes to the beehive, get ready to tease! Put your head down and separate your hair into two big sections: top and bottom. It doesn’t need to be precise, you just don’t want to end up teasing too much of the bottom section yet.
 
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Take that front section and literally tease from the middle of your hair to your crown. Make it a crazy birds nest of a mess, but stay in that front section. You should have big, country star hair once you flip it back. 
 
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After you’ve done the front section, feel free to go nuts on the rest of your hair. The only reason I emphasized the top section is that if you do the bottom first, you run the risk of the teased part stopping awkwardly mid-length. Once it’s teased in that section, it’s harder to get it properly pouffed at the top. 
 
P.S. You’re definitely gonna need deep conditioner to get this all out. At one point, I was wearing my hair like this all the time and even though I washed it daily, I started to develop a weird bouffant dreadlock.  BEWARE of the scary dreadlock!
 
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Go ahead and flip your head over. Brush the top part of your hair so that it looks relatively smooth and give the top section a shot of hairspray.
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At this point, all you have to do is pull the sides taught and pin them back using a few bobby pins. Make sure the bobby pins are in tight. After that, you can easily wear the beehive half up or half down. You can also curl the ends for extra flippy fanciness. 
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If you want to put your hair up, then take the bottom section of your hair and pull it together as if you’re doing a low ponytail. Twist it tightly upward and fold it over so that the twist is half up and half down. Slightly tuck everything inward to hide the roll and add as many bobby pins necessary. This is a standard up-do tuck, but even I still have trouble sometimes. Just like the initial bouffant roll, make sure a few of the bobby pins are positioned at the top and the bottom of the little rolled section you’ve just created. It should sort of hide seamlessly, but don’t beat yourself up if it turns out a bit messy (like mine). 
 
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The final result is a bonafide beehive. The bigger, the better I say! Go big or go home! My inner Ronnette is very happy right now. 
 
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Giving off some Wilma Flintstone vibes..

 
Oh YEAH, so apparently there is third way to create a beehive using a loofa or balled up tights underneath your hair. Gotta say, I don’t think this is my cup of tea. 
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