Hunter Moore's Revenge Porn: Now With Driving Directions to Your House

Huntermoore.tv will be porting a lot of content from the original “Is Anyone Up?” and it’ll be adding lots more user-submitted material, along with a chilling new submission field: address.

Nov 29, 2012 at 3:30pm | Leave a comment

Remember Hunter Moore and “Is Anyone Up?” Let me refresh your memory: the site, which closed in April of this year, featured nude pictures of people along with personal information, submitted by spiteful exes. And, one presumes, other people with bones to pick. It was a huge hit with misogynist douchnozzles (most of the images featured women) who must have all been devastated when it closed. The Internet is a continual competition for Misogynist of the Year

Now, Moore is back, with a project that’s even more disgusting, and frankly terrifying. Huntermoore.tv will be porting a lot of content from the original “Is Anyone Up?” and it’ll be adding lots more user-submitted material, along with a chilling new submission field: address.

Yeah, that’s right. Now not only can people upload nude or otherwise compromising images of you to the Internet without your permission (along with sexts and other data), they can also include your address. If that doesn’t have your heart racing, you’ve probably never been stalked or threatened online; when I read about it, I had to take a little time out with my head between my knees and some deep breaths before I could return to normal human function.

SUCH AN UPSTANDING EXAMPLE OF HUMANITY YOU ARE

In Moore’s announcement for the site, which isn’t up and running just yet, he pledges that he’s learned from his experiences with “Is Anyone Up?” and this site will be “better than before,” by which he means even more misogynistic and creepy, apparently. And he’s eager to assure anyone who asks that he refuses to take responsibility for the content, relying on the legal protection provided by the fact that site owners aren’t responsible for user-submitted material.

His announcement also included a stark reversal on his earlier statements about why he shut down “Is Anyone Up?” in the first place; he’d sold the domain to an anti-bullying group, and suggested that he was troubled by “ruining young women’s lives.” Now he’s referring to bullying -- a serious issue that sometimes results in suicide -- as a “lame and boring fad that soccer moms love.”

So much for your commitment to humanity there, Moore. You rock on with your gross, misogynistic, douchebaggy self. Not to mention your incredibly wealthy self; ad revenues from “Is Anyone Up?” were huge, and we can expect they’ll be even higher with this site, which will include not just submissions from users but also social media functions as well, like badges (one shudders to imagine what sorts of badges people can earn) and real-life events people can attend to hook up with their sleazy misogynist friends.

LADIES, DON'T LET PEOPLE TAKE NUDIES OF YOU IF YOU DON'T WANT PEOPLE TO SEE THEM!

Every time discussions about these kinds of sites, and revenge publication of private material from relationships in general, comes up, there’s a lot of discussion about what people post online and how it can be used. Kate recently covered Badabing, an app that allows people to troll Facebook for bikini photos (gross), and encountered a lot of pushback from people arguing that if you post your bikini photos online, you should expect people to look at them.

And, by extension apparently, to use them for personal gratification; evidently you shouldn’t post vacation photos or participate in projects intended to empower yourself, like the Adipositivity Project, if you don’t want people to use your images in ways that might make you uncomfortable.

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Yes, I'm posting this boudouir shot without permission. 

In the case of “revenge porn” like this, people are taking very private images and making them very public. Recent years have provided a slew of examples of people sharing sexts and naughty pictures through cell phones, particularly in schools, where an unwitting girlfriend might send a nude pic to her boyfriend only to have it circulated through their entire class for everyone’s amusement but hers.

And online, it’s the work of a moment to submit a nudie pic that isn’t yours, without the consent of the person depicted.

In the case of private material turned public, the issue should be even more cut-and-dried; someone sent data with the expectation that it would be private. And when that information is made public for purposes of humiliation, shaming, or anything else, we should be able to agree that’s not okay. Yet, a lot of people want to blame the people who send the data in the first place, arguing that they should be more careful. Because clearly the responsibility here should lie with people who think they are in a trusting relationship, not with their partners or friends.

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What passes for a saucy text in my relationship. Yes, I know my screen is dirty. 

I don’t buy this argument. It falls in line with all the other things women are told to do in order to prevent assault, abuse and harassment, putting the responsibility on victims rather than the perpetrators of crimes and abuses. As long as the focus is on telling women how to “avoid” becoming victims, rather than on telling people how to avoid abusing women, this is going to be a losing battle.

You want to stop revenge porn and the nonconsensual distribution of personal texts, videos and photos? Start by telling the people who receive those things to keep them private, not by telling the people who send them that they’re just getting what’s coming to them for daring to be sensual or sexual with people they think they can trust.

TAKING REVENGE PORN TO A NEW LEVEL

Moore took revenge porn to a new level with the inclusion of personal details, connecting random naked people with specific social information and linking the two. His identification of the people depicted had serious ramifications, making it much easier for people to find those images and potentially abuse them.

Whether it was people who wanted to bully the subjects of nude photos (some undoubtedly not just posted without permission but also taken without permission), or people who might be searching for information about a job application, having that information readily available could have a tremendous negative impact on the person depicted.

The addition of addresses to all the other personal information on his new site is even more sinister and chilling. As someone who receives very credible threats to my safety, some of which have included my address, I know well the sinking, panicked feeling you get when you know that someone who very much means you harm knows exactly how to find you. The thought of having compromising material about me posted online along with details on how to find me sends me into a blind tailspin of panic, and I know I’m not the only one.

Revenge porn can take on a whole new aspect when it’s possible not only to publicly shame people, but also to ensure that other people can find them. This is a level of vindictiveness that can include the risk of physical harm to people along with psychological distress and discrimination; images like these can be used as grounds to fire people, not hire them in the first place, refuse to rent to them, or investigate them as unfit parents, among other things.

The fact that this is all legally protected is deeply troubling; while I support the right to free speech, that does not include the right to speech without consequences. While Moore may hide behind the fact that he's just the messenger, obviously he's enabling the spread of such material and the possibility of a high number of pageviews, so he's definitely playing a key role here. 

Posting private material like this should come with repercussions for the poster and the person who facilitated the expose, not just the victim.