The No Colour, Colour Scheme of the Season

Even now, black and white clothes still scream “waitress” and “liar” to me.
Avatar:
DIANE
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
0
Even now, black and white clothes still scream “waitress” and “liar” to me.

My first ever job was in a restaurant and of course, I had to wear the universal waitress uniform of white shirt and black skirt. This was in 1993 and since then, I have never, and I do mean NEVER, worn a black skirt or trousers with a white shirt because it takes me back to those days when that “waitressing” job actually turned out to be a “plate washing” job. I was duped.

Even now, black and white clothes still scream “waitress” and “liar” to me. Apart from that, I also find black and white a little boring. I don’t even watch black and white films. In my eyes, black and white is the wardrobe default setting, akin to the factory settings on your phone or computer. It’s the starting point that you build on and personalise to suit your requirements; it’s not where you finish.

Black and white is stark and I generally find it hard to wear because I always just want to throw on some colour. However, I’ve recently decided that it’s much more palatable in print format. Solid monochrome separates often seem cold and hard-edged to me, but a striking black and white print will turn my head faster than an Idris Elba lookalike in the local supermarket. Take for example this ASOS dress.

I did want to include a link to the dress but even though I only bought it last week it’s no longer on the website. Sometimes fashion moves too quickly for me!

I did want to include a link to the dress but even though I only bought it last week it’s no longer on the website. Sometimes fashion moves too quickly for me!

ASOS is my first stop fat girl fashion hangout online and this body con number caught my attention immediately. I’d hit “add to basket” within ten seconds of seeing it, which is a personal record, even for an impulse buy. The print is interesting enough to keep me, well, interested, and the curves and waves in the print fit nicely over my own curves and waves.

I tried so hard to keep this outfit completely monochrome but my entire being just wouldn’t accept it. It’s as though there’s something in my very core that just will not tolerate an entirely black and white outfit, no matter how hard I try. I was totally monochrome until about five minutes before I left the house, when I stopped and reached for the multi colour vintage 80’s necklace to add a little colour and save my fashion life.

This is going to be one trend I struggle to embrace as with all its simplicity, it’s still a hard look for me to bring myself to wear. Black and white combinations were all over the spring/ summer 2013 catwalks from Marc Jacobs to Michael Kors, but despite all the high end endorsements I probably won’t wear it in its purest monochromatic form.

I’ve got to have a little colour pop and pattern in there somewhere, it must be in my genes. Having said that there are lots of fantastic plus size black and white clothes and accessories available now whether you like your monochrome graphic, floral, colour blocked, or with colour.

Geometrical dress, £139, oneone3.co.uk

Geometrical dress, £139, oneone3.co.uk

Tabitha colourblock dress, $195, monifc.com

Tabitha colourblock dress, $195, monifc.com

Inspire Monochrome Contrast Panel Tie Blouse, £22.99, newlook.com

Inspire Monochrome Contrast Panel Tie Blouse, £22.99, newlook.com

Contrast collar print dress, £40, simplybe.co.uk

Contrast collar print dress, £40, simplybe.co.uk

Ready side buckle sandals, £50, topshop.com

Ready side buckle sandals, £50, topshop.com

Will you be wearing black and white this season or sticking to a brighter more cheerful palette? Which trend should Diane try next? Tell her on Twitter @fatgirlclothes